Author Topic: Krikzz - Everdrive Question  (Read 310 times)

Krikzz - Everdrive Question
« on: August 05, 2020, 02:35:42 pm »
Does anyone own any products from Krikzz? If so I'm looking to own an everdrive 64 (which to those who are not familiar is basically just every n64 game loaded onto a single cartridge).

I'm not too knowledgeable in this area so I'm just curious though how is this legal, and how is Krikzz able to sell this product and make a profit off of nintendo products? Do they have some deal with nintendo?

To my understanding, the only way it becomes illegal for me is if I stream/make videos off of these games without owning the actual games correct (not that I think anyone would care enough or enforce this)?

Can someone shed some light on this? Thanks.

-edited Kritzz to Krikzz (thanks pzeke)
« Last Edit: August 05, 2020, 03:57:47 pm by jdkw50 »

pzeke

Re: Kritzz - Everdrive Question
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2020, 03:30:50 pm »
You mean Krikzz. According to most reviews I've seen/read, their stuff seems to be good.

As for the legality of it all, it's a gray area.

To my understanding, the only way it becomes illegal for me is if I stream/make videos off of these games without owning the actual games correct (not that I think anyone would care enough or enforce this)?

This is where your moral compass comes into play. Are you okay with playing a game you don't physically own? Would you be okay to stream or record gameplay of a game you don't physically own? This is all personal.

Truth be told, people stream/record themselves emulating games all the time, as in playing ROMs. No one will come knocking down your door because you're doing this - nobody will know you're doing it unless you say you are.

Anyway, in case you're interested, there's a cheaper, knockoff version of the ED64 that seems to be quite good as well called ED64Plus.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2020, 03:57:47 pm by pzeke »

VGCollect: Hypocrisy Unbound

Re: Kritzz - Everdrive Question
« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2020, 04:01:49 pm »

This is where your moral compass comes into play. Are you okay with playing a game you don't physically own? Would you be okay to stream or record gameplay of a game you don't physically own? This is all personal.

Anyway, in case you're interested, there's a cheaper, knockoff version of the ED64 that seems to be quite good as well called ED64Plus.

Luckily I don't intend to do any of that content creation stuff, just playing it own as a hobby or with friends. But I do see the grey area you're referring to.

And thanks for the suggestion I'll definitely need to check out ED64 as well.

sworddude

Re: Krikzz - Everdrive Question
« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2020, 06:09:09 pm »
Does anyone own any products from Krikzz? If so I'm looking to own an everdrive 64 (which to those who are not familiar is basically just every n64 game loaded onto a single cartridge).

I'm not too knowledgeable in this area so I'm just curious though how is this legal, and how is Krikzz able to sell this product and make a profit off of nintendo products? Do they have some deal with nintendo?

To my understanding, the only way it becomes illegal for me is if I stream/make videos off of these games without owning the actual games correct (not that I think anyone would care enough or enforce this)?

Can someone shed some light on this? Thanks.

-edited Kritzz to Krikzz (thanks pzeke)


if I'm looking at the krizz site I'm pretty sure you have to find all the roms manually, so if your looking for all n64 roms you won't get them pre installed you'll need to find a torrent with the whole collection or all roms seperately, the hardware is perfectly legal only the roms are the problem especially big titles like mario or zelda, that is why nintendo didn't bother. he only seems to sell the software to run them original games not the roms themselves

The exception in wich you are allowed to use roms is if you own a physical or digital copy of said game. That's technically the only legal way to use roms of a game. Still I would ignore the grey area's they aren't going to hunt single people down from using old games it's not worth the effort it's not hurting their sales, let alone if they would ever try to provide the games on the original console to the consumer.

Overall them roms themselves are not a grey area it's a black area it's illegal, if nintendo really wants to they can hunt you down, it's just not going to happen and they will probably not even bother since it would cost to much time and money to hunt single people down. they only way to be caught is literally going to the police or nintendo themselves and admit that your using nintendo roms. The only way for nintendo ninja's to find you is if your making money just selling them actual roms or current gen games on a bigger scale. but everdrives themselves are not roms just software to run them, that part is perfectly legal.

Eitherway it being illegal could be ignored I'd say, nintendo doesn't provide the original experience anymore let alone that they aren't making a ton of money out of it either, especially the niche stuff that will never see even a digital download ever. Not to mention that otherwise pretty much every everdrive user would have been in jail by now. It's pretty much the same copying movies back in the day. Still snes and ps1 mini didn't really provide the best emulation exeperiece a proffesional company messing that up, differen colors on the snes mini for example or tons of glitches on the ps1 mini. can we like not forget all them sound issues for them sega games and even with it's most recent collection it again has tons of faults. it's kinda ironic how manually searching for good roms beats proffesionals, Fan translations for japanese exclusives wich again only available illegaly since companies will never do those. it's a sad era if your only going legal for old games.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2020, 06:48:57 pm by sworddude »
Your Stylish Sword Master!



Re: Krikzz - Everdrive Question
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2020, 07:15:02 pm »
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« Last Edit: August 05, 2020, 07:18:10 pm by jdkw50 »

Re: Krikzz - Everdrive Question
« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2020, 07:17:53 pm »
Does anyone own any products from Krikzz? If so I'm looking to own an everdrive 64 (which to those who are not familiar is basically just every n64 game loaded onto a single cartridge).

I'm not too knowledgeable in this area so I'm just curious though how is this legal, and how is Krikzz able to sell this product and make a profit off of nintendo products? Do they have some deal with nintendo?

To my understanding, the only way it becomes illegal for me is if I stream/make videos off of these games without owning the actual games correct (not that I think anyone would care enough or enforce this)?

Can someone shed some light on this? Thanks.

-edited Kritzz to Krikzz (thanks pzeke)


if I'm looking at the krizz site I'm pretty sure you have to find all the roms manually, so if your looking for all n64 roms you won't get them pre installed you'll need to find a torrent with the whole collection or all roms seperately, the hardware is perfectly legal only the roms are the problem especially big titles like mario or zelda, that is why nintendo didn't bother. he only seems to sell the software to run them original games not the roms themselves


Ah I see, thanks for clarifying that. Yeah that would make sense, if he did sell ROM's then that would be pretty illegal. So he's just selling the hardware which harbors the ROM's that the consumer has the responsibility of getting. Gotcha.

droaa

Re: Krikzz - Everdrive Question
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2020, 10:51:07 pm »
I've purchased the Everdrive N8 for NES, SD2SNES, Mega Everdrive X7 and Everdrive 64. They have been worth the money in my opinion and has been a great way to curate with what I currently have for those consoles rather than try to purchase everything or massive amount of money for one game. What I have done in the past is buy them during Black Friday weekend as they sell them for 20% off the regular price.

pzeke

Re: Krikzz - Everdrive Question
« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2020, 11:39:55 am »
Ah I see, thanks for clarifying that. Yeah that would make sense, if he did sell ROM's then that would be pretty illegal. So he's just selling the hardware which harbors the ROM's that the consumer has the responsibility of getting. Gotcha.

Wait, you thought that these type of carts are sold with games pre-installed on them?

With the exclusion of certain people selling secondhand carts on eBay, for these types of carts specifically you will have to look for the games yourself, which isn't really as hard as some people might lead you to believe. If your Google-fu is on point, you can find almost any game. That said, selling this type of items with pre-installed games is something that's not exactly allowed, but people get away with it. For instance, since I mentioned eBay, they specifically prohibit this, but you'll find dozens of different listings offering 500-in-1 carts, most of the time for the NDS, which often use R4 knockoffs to achieve this...not to mention most of this listings come from China. But like I said in my last post, it's a gray area; eBay for instance has their rules concerning this, but there are ways to circumvent them, especially when there's so many listings of near the same item and their bots are as competent as a monkey with a wrench. To give you a better example, you can sell an NES Classic on eBay no problem, but you shouldn't sell that same NES Classic with additional games on it, but hey, you'll still see people doing it. The entirety of the mini consoles are a perfect example of this. The website's reliance on their bots and people actually reporting these type of listings is what pretty much causes these listings to stay and permeate the website: the bots don't work as they should and most people just don't care.

Anyway, before I keep going off on a tangent, all in all, as I often tell most people I know that want to get into "retro gaming", I would recommend you to invest in a flash cart. Unless you were fortunate enough to amass a collection before the boom, or happen to have deep pockets and don't mind spending a fortune on games, flash carts are an excellent way to experience and play the games you want...other than your computer and an emulator, of course. You're on the Internet, just a couple key strokes way from learning and finding what you want, so dig around the web, there's plenty of written and video reviews for whatever flash cart you may be interested in. Overall, they're a great investment, whether purists want to admit it or not.

VGCollect: Hypocrisy Unbound